The Thanksgiving Roll Round-up

I usually make 2-3 kinds of rolls for Thanksgiving dinner: a crusty roll, a dried fruit, slightly sweet roll, and a soft buttery dinner roll. If you need any ideas for your own baking, here are some really great rolls.

Chewy Italian NEW 2
Chewy Italian Rolls
A non-fat, start-the-night before, yummy bread, especially good for the end of meal plate cleaning 🙂

KAFs Photo!

KAFs Photo!

Golden Pull-Apart Buns
These rolls have a great light texture, but not nearly as much butter as many other rolls of the same character have. This roll is great!

Crescent Roll 1
Crescent Rolls
This is the best roll. Sooo delicious and the best crumb. It also rivals pies in terms of the amount of butter, but it’s definitely worth it!

I hope this picture gives an idea of the great texture this roll has

I hope this picture gives an idea of the great texture this roll has

BA Poppyseed Buttermilk Bun
I love that this roll is made with cream, not butter, so it seems faster to make up. Bakes beautifully, but, like the roll before, not really the lightest calorie option! I also left off the poppyseeds in this photo, but they are also a beautiful addition.

thumb
Crusty European Roll
Another great nonfat, crusty roll from King Arthur Flour (as is this picture), that you have to start the night before, but is a lovely addition to the sweeter, more bodied options!

Golden Pull-Apart Dinner Rolls

KAFs Photo!

KAFs Photo!

A new favorite roll recipe! This recipe appealed to me for Thanksgiving dinner, because it doesn’t have nearly as much butter as many other roll recipes, and since Thanksgiving is quite the heavy meal anyway, I thought it would be a good option. I loved it! It was such a good suggestion from the King Arthur Flour site, I’ve gone back many times since looking for other great recipes. I’ll be posting some of those soon!

Golden Pull Apart Dinner Rolls

  • 3 1/2 c. Unbleached All-Purpose Flour
  • 2 t. instant yeast
  • 2 T. potato flour or 1/4 cup instant potato flakes
  • 3 T.  nonfat dry milk
  • 2 T. sugar
  • 1 1/2 t. salt
  • 4 T. soft butter
  • 2/3 c. lukewarm water
  • 1/2 c. lukewarm milk
  • 2 T. melted butter, for topping

1) Combine all of the dough ingredients in a large bowl, and mix and knead — using your hands, a stand mixer, or a bread machine set on the dough cycle — to make a soft, smooth dough.

2) Place the dough in a lightly greased container — an 8-cup measure works well here. Cover the container, and allow the dough to rise for 60 to 90 minutes, until it’s just about doubled in bulk.

3) Gently deflate the dough, and transfer it to a lightly greased work surface.

4) Divide the dough into 16 equal pieces, by dividing in half, then in halves again, etc. Round each piece into a smooth ball.

5) Lightly grease two 8″ round cake pans. Space 8 buns in each pan. Can you use 9″ round cake pans, or a 9″ x 13″ pan? Sure; the buns just won’t nestle together as closely, so their sides will be a bit more baked.

6) Cover the pans, and allow the buns to rise till they’re crowded against one another and quite puffy, about 60 to 90 minutes. Towards the end of the rising time, preheat the oven to 350°F.

7) Uncover the buns, and bake them for 22 to 24 minutes, until they’re golden brown on top and the edges of the center bun spring back lightly when you touch it. An instant-read thermometer inserted into the middle of the center bun should register at least 190°F.

8) Remove the buns from the oven, and brush with the melted butter. After a couple of minutes, turn them out of the pan onto a cooling rack.

Yield: 16 buns.