Lemon and Blueberry Teacakes

 

Lemon and Blueberry Teacakes

I was so excited to buy Ottolenghi’s new baking book, Sweet, in late fall, but have found myself so busy that I haven’t baked from it yet. Recently, though, when I was looking for a good springtime treat to share with friends, I came upon this recipe from that book. It looked terrific, and it tasted even better. I even got rave reviews from the piano movers who happened to be at our house when the cakes came out of the oven.  And since many of house in my house are lemon lovers, I’m sure I’ll use it frequently. (Note: I usually buy almond flour at Costco these days, if you are looking for an affordable and easy option.)

Lemon Blueberry Teacakes

Makes about 12 cupcakes

3/4 c. + 1 1/2 T. (190 g) unsalted butter, cubed, at room temperature
1/4 c. + 1 T. (45g) all-purpose flour
2 c. (190g) ground almonds
3/4 c. +  3 1/2 T. (190g) sugar
4 eggs
1/4 c. (60 ml) lemon juice
finely grated zest of one lemon
1/4 t. salt (the original amount is 1/8)
1/4 t. baking powder
2/3 c. (100g) blueberries

Glaze:
a few squeezes of lemon juice
freshly grated lemon zest of one lemon (my addition)
1 1/3 c. (160g) icing sugar

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees (180°). Grease all 12 molds of a regular muffin pan with butter and dust lightly but thoroughly with flour. Tap away any excess and set aside.

Place the butter, granulated sugar and lemon zest in the bowl of an electric mixer with the paddle attachment in place. Beat on medium-high speed until light, then add the eggs and almond meal in three or four alternating batches. Sift the flour, baking powder and salt into a bowl, then add this to the mixer and turn the speed to low. Finally, add the lemon juice and eat until combined. Spoon the mixture into the molds and divide the 2/3 c. blueberries between the cakes: push them down slightly so that they sink into the batter. The reason we do this is to ensure that each cake gets an equal number of berries.

 

Bake for 30-35 minutes, until the edges are lightly golden and a skewer inserted into the centre of the cakes comes out clean. Leave to cool for about 10 minutes before tapping them out gently onto a cooling rack so that they are sitting upside down. Cool completely.

To make the icing: combine the confectioners’ sugar and zest and juice in a bowl and stir until it has a thick pouring consistency. Spoon the icing over the cakes and dot the remaining blueberries in the center (or strawberries!). Serve.

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Chocolate & Cream Yule Log

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The Christmas and New Year Season has died down, the kids and my husband and I are all back in school, and I’m finally getting a moment to record the fun baking we did at Christmas this year. My favorite part: the Buche de Noel. This Christmas cake is a tradition my dad brought home with him from France, and he’s usually the one who bakes it each year, but I was excited that he let me make it this year.

I found this recipe in one of the funnest baking books I own, called Baked. I will include their directions, though I changed them a bit. I’m not as big of a fan of malted milk balls as they are, so I substituted chestnut paste  (which is a more traditional French flavor) and I also made it into the more traditional log instead of a stump. Otherwise, I was super happy with how it turned out. Hope it goes this well again next year!

Chocolate & Cream Yule Log

  • 1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting
  • 1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder, sifted
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 3/4 pound bittersweet chocolate, melted and cooled
  • 2 tablespoons instant espresso powder dissolved in 1/4 cup of hot water (I would cut this down to 1 T. next time. I thought it was the dominant flavor as is)
  • 1 dozen large eggs, at room temperature, separated
  • 1 1/3 cups sugar
  • 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar
  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
  • Malted Buttercream and Dark Chocolate Buttercream
  • Meringue mushrooms, candied cranberries and candied rosemary sprigs, for garnish (optional; see Note)

Preheat the oven to 350. Butter two 12-by-17-inch rimmed baking sheets and line them with parchment paper, leaving a 1-inch overhang on all of the short sides. Butter the paper and dust with flour.

In a small bowl, whisk the 1 cup of flour with the cocoa and salt. In another small bowl, combine the chocolate and espresso. In the bowl of a standing electric mixer, combine the egg yolks with 2/3 cup of the sugar. Set the bowl over a pan of simmering water and whisk until the sugar is dissolved. Transfer the bowl to the mixer fitted with the whisk and beat at high speed until the yolks are pale and thick, about 5 minutes. Beat in the melted chocolate mixture along with the vanilla. Transfer to a large bowl.

Thoroughly wash and dry the mixer bowl and the whisk. Beat the egg whites with the cream of tartar on moderately high speed until soft peaks form. Gradually add the remaining 2/3 cup of sugar and continue beating at high speed until the whites are glossy, about 2 minutes longer. Whisk one-fourth of the egg whites into the cake batter, then fold in the remaining whites until no streaks remain.

In a small bowl, whisk the melted butter with 1/2 cup of the batter; fold this mixture into the batter. Working in 2 batches, sift the cocoa powder mixture over the batter and gently fold it in. Divide the batter between the prepared pans, spreading it out to fill the pans. Bake for about 18 minutes, until the cake feels springy and dry; shift the pans from top to bottom and front to back halfway through baking. Transfer the pans to racks to cool completely. Run the tip of a knife around the edges, cover with parchment paper and a baking sheet and invert; peel off the parchment on top.

Spread the Malted Buttercream over the cakes. Using a ruler, cut each cake precisely in half lengthwise, cutting through the paper; you should have four 6-by-17-inch strips of cake. Roll one strip into a tight coil, leaving the paper behind. Roll the 3 remaining cake strips around the coil in the same way to form a very wide, short jelly roll. Set the cake on a large plate, spiraled end up. Frost the outside of the cake with the Dark Chocolate Buttercream. Refrigerate until set, at least 8 hours. Decorate the cake with meringue mushrooms, cranberries and rosemary sprigs and serve, cutting the cake into wedges or horizontal slices.

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Chocolate & Malted Buttercream

  • 5 large egg whites, at room temperature
  • 1 1/2 cups sugar
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 4 sticks (1 pound) unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • 4 ounces bittersweet chocolate, melted and cooled
  • 1/4 cup malt powder, dissolved in 2 tablespoons of hot water
  • 12 malted milk balls, crushed (I used chestnut paste instead. Or, I think I would just use vanilla bean paste)

In the bowl of a standing electric mixer, combine the egg whites and sugar. Set the bowl over a pot of simmering water and whisk until the sugar is dissolved and the egg whites are just warm to the touch. Return the bowl to the mixer fitted with the whisk. Add the vanilla and beat the egg whites at high speed until firm and glossy, about 5 minutes. With the machine on, whisk in the butter a few tablespoons at a time. If the mixture begins to look curdled, continue to beat until smooth before adding more butter. Transfer 1 1/2 cups of the buttercream to a bowl and whisk in the melted chocolate. Beat the dissolved malt powder into the remaining buttercream, then beat in the milk balls.

 

Summer Lime Cake

 

Zucchini and Lime Cake
This was such an unusual sounding cake, I had to try it. I expected a flavor totally different than what came out. Essentially, this cake is just a really moist cake with a terrific lime frosting on top. In fact, my father-in-law asked if it was a “key-lime cake,” and then had another slice, and my twelve-year-old (who was complaining that if I made a zucchini cake, no kids would it eat) ate four slices. So, I think if you’re not really into zucchini, you’re still likely to enjoy this cake! I’ve made it twice in the last week, which says a little bit about how well zucchini are growing around here. This recipe comes from Three Sisters Bake, an enchanting cookbook by these Scottish sisters that is a delight to read and look at. I’ve adjusted the measurements for US, but included the original ones as well. I’ve also adapted the baking powder for better results at high temperature (if you’re at sea level, you may want to take it down a teaspoon).

Summer Lime Cake
For the cake:

  • 1/2 c. (135ml) sunflower oil
  • 4/5 c. (200g) caster sugar
  • 3 large eggs, at room temperature
  • 2 1/2 c. (300g) all-purpose flour
  • 4 tsp. baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 12 oz. (335g) zucchini, finely grated
  • grated zest of 2 limes

For the icing:

  • 3/4 c. (200g) full-fat cream cheese, at room temperature
  • 3/4 c. (100g) icing sugar
  • grated zest of 1 lime
  • juice from 2-3 limes

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees (160C, gas 2). Line the base and sides of an 8-in. springform cake pan with parchment paper.

Beat the oil, sugar and eggs together in a large bowl with an electric hand mixer for 2-3 minutes, until light and fluffy. Sift in the flour, baking powder, and salt and fold into the mixture. Fold in the grated zucchini and lime zest.

Pour into the prepared tin and bake for 40-45 minutes, until golden brown and a skewer inserted into the middle of the cake comes out clean. Allow the cake to cool a little in the tin, then turn out onto a wire rack.

To make the icing, beat the cream cheese and icing sugar together until smooth. Add the lime zest and juice and beat another 2-3 minutes on high to get really light and fluffy.

Once cool, top the cake with the icing by running a spatula or palate knife back and forth over the cake creating deep grooves to give a nice textural look.

Zucchini and Lime Cake 2

If you look closely, you can see my cream cheese wasn’t at room temperature for this one. Whoops!

 

 

Buttery Blueberry Crumb Cake

Blueberry Crumb Cake

Smitten Kitchen is a wonderful blog, and although I’ve spent a little time exploring it, I’ve spent much more time looking at Deb Perelman’s cookbook of the same name, which has such terrific ideas and spins on tastes and flavors. Very inspirational. And of course, I’m right on board with her when it comes to baking. This is one of my favorite bakes from this cookbook. I made it last weekend for my sister’s baby blessing, and am happy to share the recipe here for those who were wanting it! Such a simple cake, but just delicious, and perfect for brunches or breakfast or dessert. Interestingly, this is not the same recipe that is on her blog! 

Buttery Blueberry Crumb Cake

Streusel
6 tablespoons (40 grams) all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons cornmeal
1/2 cup (100 grams) granulated sugar
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, cold is fine
Pinch of salt

Cake:
1 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 cup cornmeal
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon table salt
8 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened
1 cup (150 grams) granulated sugar
1/4 teaspoon lemon zest
2 large eggs
1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 cups fresh blueberries, clean and dry
1/3 cup sour cream

Heat oven to 350°F. Butter a 8-inch square baking pan (with at least 2″ sides) and dust it lightly with flour, or line it with a round of parchment paper or spray with nonstick spray.

In a medium bowl, whisk flour, cornmeal, baking powder, and salt until combined, and set aside. In a mixing bowl, beat butter and sugar together until light and fluffy (about two minutes). Add eggs one at a time, then add the vanilla and the zest and beat until combined. Beat in 1/3 of the dry ingredient mixture until just combined, followed by all of the sour cream; repeat with another 1/3 of the flour, mix, and then combine the blueberries with the remaining flour mixture and fold this blueberry-flour mixture gently into the batter.

Pour cake batter into prepared pan and smooth so that it is relatively flat. Prepare the streusel by mixing the flour, cornmeal, sugar, cinnamon and salt, then mash in the butter in with a pastry blender, fork or your fingertips until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs.

Sprinkle the cake with the prepared streusel. Bake in heated oven for 40(ish) minutes (mine has taken 50 minutes, but the original recipe suggested 35), or until a toothpick inserted into the middle of the cake comes out batter-free. You can let the cake cool completely in the pan on a rack, or just cool it in the pan for 20 minutes before flipping it out onto a cooling rack, removing the parchment paper lining, and flipping it back onto a plate. Enjoy!

 

Passion Fruit Tres Leches Cake

Passion Fruit Tres LechesI got thinking about one of my favorite Brazilian desserts, Passion Fruit mousse, and realized it has a lot in common with tres leches cake and actually could make a tres leches cake even more fantastic. So, I brought them together and loved the result. There really isn’t much else to compare passion fruit with! The flavor is just stunning, and now that a local market carries REAL passion fruit, I could even scoop some of the flesh out for a delightful finish on top of the cream. What a delicious dessert! I also put this as part of my cinco de mayo menu, and loved it.

Passion Fruit Tres Leches Cake

  • 12 T. (180 grams) butter (softened)
  • 1 cup superfine sugar
  • 2 T. vanilla extract, divided
  • the grated zest of 1 lemon
  • 5 eggs, room temperature
  • 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 1/4 t. baking powder (cut down to 1 t. if at high altitude!)
  • 1/2 t. salt
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 cup sweetened condensed milk
  • 1 cup passion fruit pulp (I find this in the frozen section of a Latin American Market)
  • 2 cups whipping cream
  • 1/3 c. powdered sugar
  • passion fruit (fresh, pulp, to serve)

Prepare a small casserole dish (7″x 11″) or 8″ spring form pan by lightly greasing it. Set aside.

Preheat oven to 350ºF. Place the butter and sugar in an electric mixer and beat for 8–10 minutes or until pale and creamy.

In a separate small bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, and salt.

To the butter and sugar mixture, add 1 T. of  vanilla extract and lemon zest and beat to combine. Gradually add the eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition. Gradually add the flour and beat until just combined. Spoon the mixture into prepared pan lined with non-stick baking paper and bake for 35-45 minutes or until a skewer comes out clean.

Meanwhile, combine the milk, condensed milk, and the 1 c. passionfruit pulp in a medium bowl, whisking to combine. While the cake is still warm, use a skewer to make holes all over the top of the cake. Gradually pour the milk mixture over the cake. [If you prepare it this way, there will be a layer of passionfruit mousse on top of the cake, which the whipped cream will rest on top of. If you would like a moister cake with the passion fruit flavor seeped inside, first pour the passion fruit pulp over the cake, then, mix the milk with the sweetened condensed milk and pour over separately. When mixed together, the passion fruit and sweetened condensed milk will make a mousse that will not seep into the cake.] Let the cake rest and room temperature for one hour, and then refrigerate it for 2-3 hours or until the milk mixture is absorbed.
Just before serving, place the cream, powdered sugar, and 1 T. vanilla extract in a bowl and whisk until soft peaks form (or beat in a stand mixer!). Top the cake with the cream and drizzle with fresh passionfruit pulp to serve.

Banana Chocolate Chip Cake with Peanut Butter Frosting

 

 

Banana Cake 2

I made this cake because it came to my email box the other day, and it just sounded really good. Plus, it got the billing that it was one of the favorite recipes of all time on bon appetit‘s website. That claim surprised me a little because very few people have reviewed it (and it only gets three forks?!!) on their site, but having said that, what a fantastic recipe! I could tell by the ingredients that this cake had a lot going for it, and the best thing about it is that all the tastes are in great balance, sweet and salty and chocolatey. I made it in a 9″x 13″ pan instead of two circle pans, because it’s more of a casual cake in my opinion, but otherwise stayed true to the original. Delicious! Everyone was poking around the kitchen the next morning, hoping to find a little extra left for breakfast. Guess that just means we need to make it again!

Banana Chocolate Chip Cake with Peanut Butter Frosting

Cake:
Nonstick vegetable oil spray
3 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking soda
2 teaspoons kosher salt
1 1/2 cups sugar
1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature
1/2 cup (packed) light brown sugar
3 large eggs
1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
2 cups mashed very ripe bananas
1 cup sour cream
1 10-ounce bag mini chocolate chips

Frosting:
2 cups creamy peanut butter
1 1/2 cups powdered sugar
1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature
2 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
Chocolate chips, mini chocolate chips, and chocolate kisses

For cake:
Preheat oven to 350°F. Coat cake pans with nonstick spray. Line bottom of pans with parchment; coat paper. Whisk flour, baking soda, and salt in a medium bowl. Using an electric mixer, beat sugar, butter, and brown sugar in a large bowl until light and fluffy, about 3 minutes. Add eggs one at a time, beating to blend between additions and occasionally scraping down sides and bottom of bowl. Beat in vanilla.

Add dry ingredients; beat on low speed just to blend. Add bananas and sour cream; beat just to blend. Fold in mini chips. Divide batter evenly among pans; smooth tops.

Bake cakes until a tester inserted into the center comes out clean, about 35 minutes (50 minutes, if using 9×13). Transfer to wire racks; let cool in pans for 10 minutes. Invert cakes onto racks; peel off parchment and let cool completely.

For frosting:
(Note: If using a 9×13 pan, a half recipe of the frosting is enough.) Using an electric mixer, beat first 4 ingredients in a medium bowl until a light and fluffy frosting forms, 2-3 minutes.

Place 1 cake on a platter. Spread 1 1/4 cups frosting over. Place remaining cake on top. Cover top and sides of cake with remaining frosting. Garnish with chocolate chips and kisses. DO AHEAD: Cake can be made 2 days ahead. Cover and chill. Let stand at room temperature for 1 hour before serving.

Banana Cake with Peanut Butter Frostin

 

 

 

Spiced Lemon Almond Cake

Spiced Lemon Almond Cake
I frequently find myself wanting to bake something, or even needing to bake something for a party or such, and then of course, not having the right ingredients around. (I actually prepare myself constantly against this horrible scenario–perusing specialty baking stores for rose water, non-pareils, anise oil, or any other thing I just may need at any given time.) At these times, baking falls back to fanning the pages of my favorite baking books just to see what I could possibly make that would still be a little interesting, new, and fun. This recipe, the original title of which is “Mrs. Chubb’s Nut Cake” did not stick out because of it’s title. In fact, the title is not a great description of what it is, and had I not been looking carefully at ingredient lists, I probably would have skipped on by it. But, it had the good fortune of my pantry being completely ready for it, so I went ahead and baked it for a friend gathering. So glad. It’s a beautiful winter cake, nuanced by the nutmeg and the cloves, with the hint of lemon and the unique texture of the almond flour. I loved that when one of my friends asked what I had been up to this year, and I replied, “not much,” his response was, “whatever! You made that cake!” The small triumphs 🙂  This recipe comes from the Brass Sister’s Heirloom Baking with the Brass Sisters, a truly sensational baking book. I served this with a homemade raspberry jam.

Spiced Lemon Almond Cake

1 c. almond flour (the original recipe has you pulse your own almonds with a little of the sugar to make your own flour, but it’s easy to buy almond meal these days, so I did)
1 c. sugar
2 c. flour
1 t. baking powder
1 t. salt
1/4 t. nutmeg
1/8 t. cloves
1 c. butter
4 eggs, separated
3 t. grated lemon zest
4 T. lemon juice
1/2 t. lemon extract
3/4 c. milk

For the topping
3 T. untoasted slivered almonds
3 T. clear sanding sugar

Set the oven in the middle position. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Cut a parchment paper or wax paper liner to fit the bottom of a 10-inch round tube pan. Coat the pan with vegetable spray. Insert the liner, spray again, and dust with flour.

To make the cake, sift the flour, baking powder, salt, nutmeg, and cloves.

Cream the butter and sugar in the bowl of a standing mixer fitted with the paddle attachment. Add egg yolks, 2 at a time. Add lemon zest, lemon juice, lemon extract, and vanilla, and mix to combine. Add sifted dry ingredients alternately with milk, mixing after each addition until completely blended. Fold in almond flour.

Place egg whites in another bowl of standing mixer fitted with the whisk attachment. Beat until egg whites hold a firm peak. Fold egg whites into batter.

To add the topping: Place batter in tube pan. Sprinkle almonds and sanding sugar on top of batter. Bake 50-55 minutes, or until tester inserted into cake comes out dry. Cool on rack completely before turning out of pan. Store loosely wrapped in wax paper at room temperature. I recommend that you serve this cake with berry preserves!

Apple Cranberry Cake

Apple Cranberry Cake

This cake is so fascinating. It’s almost too tart for my taste, and yet I’ve made it three times now in the last three weeks, and it’s been gone before nightfall. My kids have somehow equated it with the sour spray they get at the summer snow cone stands, and they have just used big ole spoons to work their way through it. And, as mentioned previously, I’m still working on the bags of cranberries I got a little bit excited about in November, so this may have another reiteration or two before Christmas. Which will just be delightful. This recipe comes from Ina Garten’s How Easy Is That? which is a really delightful book for the eager, but sometimes stressed out, hostess that I like to be.

Apple Cranberry Cake

12 oz. fresh cranberries, rinsed and picked over for stems
1 Granny Smith apple, peeled, cored, and diced
1/2 c. light brown sugar, lightly packed
1 T. grated orange zest (2 oranges)
1/4 c. freshly squeezed orange juice
1 1/8 t. ground cinnamon, divided
2 extra-large eggs, at room temperature
1 c. plus 1 T. granulated sugar
1/4 lb. (1 stick) unsalted butter, melted and slightly cooled
1 t. pure vanilla extract
1/4 c. sour cream
1 c. all-purpose flour
1/4 t. kosher salt

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F.

Combine the cranberries, apple, brown sugar, orange zest, orange juice, and 1 teaspoon of the cinnamon in a medium bowl. Set aside.

In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat the eggs on medium-high speed for 2 minutes. With the mixer on medium, add 1 cup of the granulated sugar, the butter, vanilla, and sour cream and beat just until combined. On low speed, slowly add the flour and salt.

Pour the fruit mixture evenly into a 10-inch glass pie plate. Pour the batter over the fruit, covering it completely. Combine the remaining 1 tablespoon of granulated sugar and 1/8 teaspoon of cinnamon and sprinkle it over the batter. Bake for 55 to 60 minutes, until a toothpick inserted in the middle of the cake comes out clean and the fruit is bubbling around the edges. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Apple Cran Eli

This little guy gobbled my photo shoot up in minutes. I really only had one option for my photo. But I loved seeing him go at it!

Pear + Carrot Cake with Cream Cheese Frosting

Pear and Carrot Cake

I think I’ve mentioned how in love I am with Sarah Randell’s Family Baking book. I’m nearly bowled over by every recipe–they are all simple, full of good and interesting ingredients, and perfect for every night desserts or treats. This recipe was a perfect use for all the random items in my fridge box the other night, so I made it and loved it. The pears felt so unusual to me, but they were the perfect touch. Can’t wait to include it in many fall evenings to come.

Pear + Carrot Cake with Cream Cheese Frosting

1 1/2 c. (200 g) all-purpose flour
3/4 c. (100 g) spelt flour
1 t. baking powder
1 t. bicarbonate of soda
1 T. ground cinnamon
2 pinches of ground cloves
4 large eggs
1 1/2 c. (275 g) light brown or muscovado sugar
1 c. (250 ml) virgin coconut oil or rapeseed oil
1 c. (150 g) grated carrots
2/3 c. 100 g grated zucchini (courgettes)
2 pears, cored and chopped
1 c. (150 g) walnut or pecan pieces
2/3 c. (100 g) sultanas

For the cream cheese frosting
5 T. (75 g) very soft unsalted butter
6 1/2 oz. (200 g) cream cheese, chilled
1/2 c. (100 g) authentic thick Greek yogurt, chilled
1 1/4 c. (175 g) powdered sugar, sifted
1 T. poppy seeds

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F (180˚C, 160 fan˚C, Gas 4).

Sift the flours, baking powder and baking soda into the bowl of an electric mixer (or use a large mixing bowl and an electric whisk). Tip any spelt left in the sieve into the bowl too. Add the cinnamon, cloves, eggs, sugar and oil. Mix together.

In another bowl, mix the carrots, courgettes, pears, nuts and sultanas. Using a large metal spoon, fold these ingredients into the cake mixture, making sure everything is thoroughly combined.

Divide the mixture between two 8 in. (20-cm) round cake tins that are buttered and base-lined with baking parchment. Spread the mixture out evenly with a spatula. Bake in the preheated oven for 40–45 minutes [28-30 minutes worked better for me], or until risen, golden and set in the centre. Let cool in the tins.

To make the poppy seed frosting, whisk together the butter and cream cheese, add the yogurt and icing sugar and whisk again – an electric whisk makes quick work of this. Stir in the poppy seeds, then refrigerate until needed.

Tip the cold cakes out of the tins and peel off the base papers. Place one cake on a board or serving plate, bottom-side uppermost. Spread half the frosting over it. Put the other cake on top, top-side uppermost, and spread the remaining frosting over the top.

Cinnamon Apple Fritters


Apple Fritters
Now that the nights are starting to chill again, I’m returning to some favorite fall recipes to welcome in the season
. This recipes comes from Elinor Klivans’ Donuts, which is such a fun read. This recipe takes about the same amount of time as pancakes (if you start your oil heating before anything else), and they are so yummy. Worth a special breakfast and a great way to use the fall apples. I usually double this recipe, which I guess makes about 2 dozen. 

Cinnamon Apple Fritters

1 c. all-purpose flour
1/4 c. granulated sugar
1 t. baking powder
3/4 t. ground cinnamon
1/2 t. salt
1/3 c. whole milk
1 large egg, lightly beaten
1 T. fresh lemon juice
1/2 t. grated lemon zest
1/2 t. vanilla
1 large apple, cored, peeled, and finely chopped [I’ve also used 1 c. dehydrated apples and soaked them in 1/2 c. warm water while I prepared the rest, and it works really well]
Canola or peanut oil for deep-frying

Cinnamon Glaze
3 T. unsalted butter, melted
2 1 /4 c. powdered sugar, sifted
1/2 t. ground cinnamon
1/2 t. vanilla
2 1/2 T. hot water

In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, sugar, baking powder, cinnamon, and salt. Make a well in the center of the flour mixture. Add the milk, egg, lemon juice and zest, and vanilla to the well and stir with a fork until well blended. Add the apple and stir just until evenly distributed.

Line a large baking sheet with paper towels. Pour oil to a depth of 2 inches into a deep-fryer or deep, heavy saute pan and warm over medium-high heat utnil it reads 360 degrees on a deep-frying thermometer.

Using a metal spoon, scoop up a rounded tablespoonful of the batter and drop into the hot oil, or scrape in using a second spoon. Repeat to add 5 or 6 more fritters to the oil. Be sure not to overcrowd the pan. The fritters should float to the top and puff to about double their size. Deep-fry until dark golden on the first side, about 2 minutes. Using tongs, a wire skimmer, or a slotted spoon, turn and fry until dark golden on the second side, about 1 minute longer. Transfer to the towel-lined baking sheet to drain. Reheat to fry the remaining fritters, allowing the oil to return to 360 between batches. [It’s a trick to control the temperature of the oil if you don’t have a deep fryer. For my electric stove, it works best to heat the oil on high for 5-7 minutes, then lower the temperature to about a “6.” I’m sure every stove has its quirks, so the first batch my be a bit of a trial.]

Arrange fritters on a platter and, using a spoon, drizzle about 1 t. of the glaze over each. Let the glaze set for 10 minutes. Serve.

For the Glaze:
In a bowl, whisk together the melted butter, confectioners’ sugar, cinnamon, vanilla, and 2 T. hot water until smooth. Whisk in 1-2 t. more hot water if needed to give the glaze a thin, light consistency. Use right away.